Nation, State, & Citizenship

A Brief History of Nativism: Part Three

A Brief History of Nativism: Part Three - 5.0 out of 5 based on 1 vote
This is the third installment in a special seven-part series "A Brief History of Nativism: Anti-Immigrant Bigotry in the American Past", providing an overview of these major movements, as well as the accompanying shifts in American immigration policy and their consequences. The first installment, "Colonial Dreams and Independent Reactions" is available here. The Second installment, "Knowing Nothing in Antebellum America" is available here.

Read more...

A Brief History of Nativism: Part Two

A Brief History of Nativism: Part Two - 5.0 out of 5 based on 1 vote

This is the second installment in a special seven-part series "A Brief History of Nativism: Anti-Immigrant Bigotry in the American Past", providing an overview of these major movements, as well as the accompanying shifts in American immigration policy and their consequences. The first installment,  "Colonial Dreams and Independent Reactions" is available here.

A Brief History of Nativism 

Part II: Knowing Nothing in Antebellum America

Read more...

A Brief History of Nativism: Part One

A Brief History of Nativism: Part One - 5.0 out of 5 based on 3 votes

A Brief History of Nativism: Anti-Immigrant Bigotry in the American Past

Often thought of as a nation of immigrants, at times the United States has also been a nation of nativists. Nativism, the fear of and hostility toward immigrants or other perceived "aliens," has been a mainstay of the American political landscape, even if xenophobic agitating has at times receded. At times, the U.S has been a refuge for the "homeless, tempest-tost." At other times, Americans have lashed out against newcomers, and made them the victims of mob violence, discriminatory legislation, and populist demagoguery. Both inclusiveness and nativism date to the founding of the country.

Read more...

Air War: The Anti-Immigrant Establishment’s Battle Plan

Air War: The Anti-Immigrant Establishment’s Battle Plan - 4.0 out of 5 based on 4 votes

Conventional wisdom suggests there are two distinct elements of modern campaigns: the “ground game,” the ability of campaigns to organize and mobilize supporters to get out and engage in the fight; and the “air war,” the money poured into advertising and other passive means of persuading voters to support a campaign. Finding the elusive balance between the two is said to be the key to winning.

In this latest round in battle over comprehensive immigration reform, the anti-immigrant establishment has largely conceded the ground game. One reason: their base of support evaporated.

Read more...

5 Things to Watch for in Immigration Debate

5 Things to Watch for in Immigration Debate - 5.0 out of 5 based on 5 votes

On May Day 2013 thousands of people turned out onto the streets in hundreds of cities to march for comprehensive immigration reform. With the process partially underway, IREHR takes a look at five different things human rights supporters should be keeping an eye on as the debate moves forward.

1. Tea Partiers Lead the Counter-Mobilization

In contrast to the seeming “consensus” view that immigration reform is a fait accompli, anti-immigrant forces still think they can kill the bill. Unlike the 2005-2007 battles over comprehensive immigration reform, however, there isn’t a unified opposition lead by a close-knit network of anti-immigrant groups. This time, the situation is much more fluid and complicated.

Read more...

Update: Three New Co-Sponsors Added to Bill Attacking Birthright Citizenship

Update: Three New Co-Sponsors Added to Bill Attacking Birthright Citizenship - 5.0 out of 5 based on 1 vote

Efforts to gut the Fourteenth Amendment's guarantee of birthright citizenship gained additional support in Congress this week. Three new co-sponsors signed onto Rep. Steve King's (IA-4) bill, H.R.140, the "Birthright Citizenship Act of 2013."

H.R. 140 now has twenty-three co-sponsors. Paul Broun (GA-1), Sam Graves (MO-6), and Tom Graves (GA-14) signed on as co-sponsors on February 26.

Read more...

Trey Gowdy and “Amnesty”

Trey Gowdy and “Amnesty” - 3.0 out of 5 based on 2 votes

Remember the Civil War?  It officially started in South Carolina at Fort Sumter.  While it was being fought, and hundreds of thousands of Union soldiers were dying due to Confederate bullets and ammo, President Lincoln had a standing offer of amnesty to Confederates.  All the person had to do was cease hostility and swear an oath of loyalty to the United States of America.  Shortly after Lincoln was assassinated by a Confederate sympathizer, on May 29, 1865, President Johnson offered a similar amnesty to all Confederates, except ex-officers in the rebel army, and a small number of large property owners.  They had a slight longer route back to citizenship.  That was an amnesty for open rebellion.

Rep. Trey Gowdy (R-SC), in a House Judiciary Committee hearing on immigration reform, said, “This is not our country’s first foray into amnesty,” according to the New York Times.  He worried, however, about “respect for the rule of law” if undocumented immigrants became citizens.

Gowdy was probably not talking then about the post-Civil War amnesty.  He should remember the former Confederates lack of respect for the rule of law and their violent abrogation of the Constitutional rights to equality before the law and the right to vote.  They simply massacred black men who were trying to vote.  They rose up in the Ku Klux Klan to restore white supremacy.  I guess it is in bad taste for some South Carolinians to remember all that when talking about amnesty. 

Other South Carolinians, of course, remember it all too well.  Others remember Gowdy’s support for the Tea Party movement and defense of same, all while trying to deny that he is a congressman from the Tea Parties.

The Spartanburg Tea Party remembers Rep. Gowdy, however.  They think he is “awesome.”

Read more...

Update: Bill Attacking Birthright Citizenship Adds Co-Sponsors

Update: Bill Attacking Birthright Citizenship Adds Co-Sponsors - 5.0 out of 5 based on 2 votes

Just as it appears momentum towards comprehensive immigration reform is building in the Senate, efforts to eviscerate the Fourteenth Amendment's guarantee of birthright citizenship are also picking up steam.

Read more...

Birthright Citizenship Again Under Attack in Congress

Birthright Citizenship Again Under Attack in Congress - 4.0 out of 5 based on 8 votes

Birthright citizenship—a cornerstone of the 14th Amendment that grants citizenship to everyone born on American soil—is again being challenged in Congress. On January 3, Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa) introduced H.R.140, the “Birthright Citizenship Act of 2013.”

Read more...

Nativist Bloc in Congress Mostly Intact After Election (Map)

Nativist Bloc in Congress Mostly Intact After Election (Map) - 5.0 out of 5 based on 2 votes

The anti-immigrant House Immigration Reform Caucus (HIRC) remained largely intact after the 2012 election, with the notable exception of its chair, Rep. Brian Bilbray (R-CA). In a close election, he narrowly lost his race for California’s newly created 52nd district. His defeat was one of just four losses HIRC members suffered in November.

The badly-named House Immigration Reform Caucus is composed of representatives who are most staunchly opposed to a humane immigration reform.

Read more...
Subscribe to this RSS feed

About IREHR

The Institute for Research & Education on Human Rights (IREHR) is a national organization with an international outlook examining racist, anti-Semitic, white nationalist, and far-right social movements, analyzing their intersection with civil society and social policy, educating the public, and assisting in the protection and extension of human rights through organization and informed mobilization.

Address

logo
 
 
 
 
 
National Office
P.O. Box 411552
Kansas City, MO 64141
 
Seattle Office
P.O. Box 33344
Seattle, WA 98133